Some of Our Featured Speakers

        Lynne Cherry

        Trevor Corson 

         Richard Ellis

         Sidney Horenstein

         Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, 
         Undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere
 

         Dr. Peter Rona

    

    

 

 

    

   

 

Environmental Educator Emertius Sidney Horenstein
 

THE HUDSON RIVER: TOP TO BOTTOM

The Hudson River, exclusive of its extension, the Hudson Canyon on 
the continental shelf, is the 71st largest river in the United States.  
From its source in the Adirondacks, 315 miles from its mouth, it flows 
through six geological terrains, all glaciated, recording a complex 
geologic history.  Remarkably, the final 150 miles, is a tidal estuary, 
including its freshwater northern end. Although ancestral Hudson 
originated in the Mesozoic Era, its post-glacial history is most 
important in understanding many aspects of its present diverse biota. 
During the Pleistocene the Hudson Valley was probably covered in 
part several times by glaciers and during the last glacial maximum the 
whole valley was shaped ice. As its mouth the Hudson is joined by the 
Raritan River, together forming the significant estuary of the New York Bight. 
And yet with all of the substantial alterations that have occurred within 
and adjacent to the river - filling, dredging and loads of pollutants - 
it is surprising that some significant habitats as well as its diversity remain.

 

Sidney Horenstein


Sidney Horenstein recently retired from the American Museum of Natural History 
as coordinator of Environmental Programs and is now Environmental Educator 
Emeritus. He is also the natural history consultant to the Bronx County Historical
Society. He also was an adjunct lecturer in the Geology and Geography Department 
of Hunter College, CUNY for 25 years.  At the museum he led numerous field trips 
and workshops and a taught a variety  of  courses in basic geology, New York 
geology and natural history. As liaison with many local environmental groups on 
current issues he organized symposia and other forums at the museum relating to 
New York City. In the past he directed the Environmental Information Center, and was
 Exhibit Curator for “On Tap” (New York’s Water Supply System), “The World of Maps” 
and “National Parks.” He also participated in the development of several temporary 
and permanent exhibits including: “Global Warming,” “Biodiversity” and 
“Human Evolution.” Directed EcoImpact Forum (monthly public meetings related to 
New York ecological issues), 1986 –1992.  He is the author of articles and books  
about geology (including New York) and now is co-authoring a book about the city’s 
biodiversity.

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Dr. Peter Rona

Exploration of Frozen Fire and Volcanoes of the Deep Sea

It is said that we know more about the backside of the Moon than the bottom of 
the ocean. The seafloor is hidden beneath a layer of water averaging 2 miles 
thick. An ocean frontier lies at our doorstep where the Hudson River channel 
continues seaward as the Hudson Canyon, one of the world’s grandest submarine 
canyons. Hudson Canyon connects New York City with the deep ocean basin. 
The canyon cuts through a largely unknown region of the continental margin underlain 
by gas hydrates, methane gas frozen into the underlying sedimentary strata. 
Farther seaward in the most remote reaches of the deep ocean lays the mid-ocean 
ridge.  The mid-ocean ridge is a submerged volcanic mountain range that encircles 
our planet as the largest and most dynamic geological feature on Earth. We used 
Hollywood’s latest filming technology to make the current IMAX film, “Volcanoes of 
the Deep Sea”, which illuminates clearly for the first time newly discovered hot 
springs and their ecosystems on the mid-ocean ridge. Join us as we embark on 
the great age of ocean exploration. 

 

Peter RonaDr. Peter Rona

 Dr. Peter Rona is internationally recognized as a pioneering leader in scientific 
exploration of the deep sea floor. He led the exploration and discovery of the first 
black smoker hot springs, giant polymetallic mineral deposits, and ecosystem of 
life forms in the deep Atlantic shown in the IMAX film, "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea". 
His discovery of the living fossil Paleodictyon is featured in the film. He has and 
continues to make expeditions to the world's oceans and to dive with all of the deep 
research submarines, which he considers safer than driving to work. As Professor
 of Marine Geology and Geophysics at Rutgers University and former Senior Research 
Geophysicist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) he 
publishes prolifically in scientific journals (over 250 papers and several books) and the 
popular media (Scientific American, National Geographic, Natural History and others). 
He is consultant to the United Nations on seafloor resources and is active in the 
development and leadership of public science centers. He has received numerous 
awards including the Shepard Medal for excellence in marine geology, the U.S. 
Department of Commerce Gold Medal for exceptional scientific contributions to the 
nation, and the Pettersson Bronze Medal of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. 
He was thrilled to work with Stephen Low and others making, 
"Volcanoes of the Deep Sea", since it illuminates the most spectacular, dynamic and 
inaccessible places on Earth as never before.

http://marine.rutgers.edu/faculty_prona.html

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Trevor Corson

 

The Secret Life of Lobsters: Bringing Science Alive by Putting it in Context"

Trevor Corson will share lessons from the writing of his science  bestseller 
The Secret Life of Lobsters. Corson will show gripping  underwater video footage, 
discuss highlights of lobster biology and  ecology, and describe how he used 
stories about the lives of the men  and women who study and harvest lobsters 
to reveal the animals' secrets.
   

Bio  http://www.secretlifeoflobsters.com/author/author.asp

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 Navy Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Ph.D., 
 Undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere.

Bio http://www.noaa.gov/lautenbacher.html

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Lynne Cherry

Lynne will focus on the importance of teaching students about mangrove 
ecosystems;  It was a 10-year-old British schoolgirl who recognized the 
signs of an impending tsunami while on vacation in Indonesia and warned 
and, hence, saved the lives of over 100 people. Mangroves mitigate the 
damage caused by tsunamis and hurricanes.  The villages where mangroves 
were intact did not suffer the death and destruction of areas that had cut down 
their mangroves. Mangroves also protect coastal areas from hurricanes. 
Children are learning how to plant, preserve and protect mangroves in Florida 
and abroad.  Lynne discusses how her books were inspired by her love of the 
natural world and how educators are using nature to integrate curriculum and 
make children’s learning relevant. Lynne is an avid canoeist, hiker, snorkeler 
and explorer.
 

 

  Lynne Cherry

 

Lynne Cherry is the author and/or illustrator of over thirty award-winning books 
for children that teach respect for the earth and launch conservation campaigns. 
In 2005, three of her books—The Great Kapok Tree, How Groundhog’s Garden Grew  
and The Shaman’s Apprentice were selected as the Best Classic Garden Books of 
the Century
by the American Horticultural Society and Junior Master Gardeners. 
A River Ran Wild
has launched projects to study and clean up local watersheds. 
Flute’s Journey: the Life of a Wood Thrush
focused national media attention on 
conservation efforts to save the 60 acre Belt Woods In Md. when Lynne and students 
who had written letters were featured on Sunday Morning News With Charles Osgood
Lynne hopes that her current book The Sea, The Storm and the Mangrove Tangle will 
help save mangroves around the world.  She has been working most recently trying to 
save mangroves on Bimini in the Bahamas. .  She lectures widely—and passionately--
about how children can make a difference. Lynne earned her BA at Tyler School of Art 
and her MA in History at Yale. She has been artist-in-residence at the Smithsonian, 
Princeton University and the Marine Biological Lab and Woods Hole Oceanographic 
Institute in Woods Hole. She is currently visiting fellow at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 in Ithaca, NY.

For more info see www.LYNNECHERRY.com
You can hear Lynne reading from several of her books if you click on the links to 
LIVING ON EARTH, a nationally syndicated show of National Public Radio (NPR). 
There are also links to programs Lynne has done on CBS and PBS.

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Richard Ellis

 

Mr. Ellis will give a short presentation "under the Blue Whale" in the New Millstein 
Hall of Ocean Science at the American Museum of Natural History

Richard Ellis

Bio  http://www.natureartists.com/artists/artist_biography.asp?ArtistID=1117

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